Tuesday, November 03, 2009

Skinny dipping in the school pool and why advocating for gifted kids is like masturbating

I'm reading: Skinny dipping in the school pool and why advocating for gifted kids is like masturbatingTweet this!

Yep, skinny dipping at school, that's how things worked in Chicago public schools back in the 1950s. Read on at Chicago Moms Blog.

I think I'm going to work the old skinny dipping as school policy into my statement advocating for gifted children in Illinois at the upcoming state board of ed budget hearing. Honestly though, I'm tempted to talk about how advocating for gifted kids is like masturbating. I feel compelled to do it (advocate, I mean), and I'll feel good for doing it (for speaking up, I mean) but it's not a very productive use of my time.

Color me cynical, but it seems to me that the most compelling arguments for recognizing gifted children as special needs children aren't apparent until one is raising such a child.

Your thoughts?

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Well, if you are correct and one can only understand the need to advocate for services and programs for gifted children if one has actually raised a gifted child, then there lies the problem. If people can not step beyond their own children and consider needs beyond their child's, then gifted children have no hope, for by their very nature, there are limited numbers of them amongst us.

Kim Moldofsky said...

Well @anonymous, it seems that way. When a person talks about children with learning disabilities or physical problems, others sympathize. It's difficult to garner that sympathy for a child who reads or does math grade levels above their age peers.

And based on my prior experience at an ISBE budget hearing, blind children, children who don't speak English, high school students who can't read are much more compelling causes than those who exceed national grade level standards.

If only our national policy mandated the need for ALL children to show learning and growth each academic year.....

Andrea Frazer said...

I might very well be in a similar position as you raising your kids, so I'll be paying attention.

Miss you!

Robin Elise Weiss said...

Having at least one of each, I'd say both are poorly served, even though they are both in state sponsored programs, neither is being served well enough.

ChefDruck said...

Kim,
I so agree with you. I've noticed how emotional people get in arguing against special services for gifted kids, almost as though having them would discriminate against other children. We need to all work together to get better services for all types of children in public schools.

Vanessa

Kim Moldofsky said...

Oh dear, it was horrible. Gifted gots its butt kicked. Look for my next post for an update.

Kristina said...

Um, very catchy title. And great post.

Laura said...

I was just directed to this post in a roundabout way from the Gifted Homeschooler's Forum FB page. I tried to click on the link to your full post, but the link seems to be broken. Would you consider making the full post on your blog?