Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Chicago's Joffrey Ballet Debuts Bold Moves



DH and I received press tickets to the Bold Moves, the season opening of Chicago's Joffrey Ballet (are tickets to Hamilton next?!). Bold Moves is playing at the Auditorium Theatre through February, 21, 2016.

As my senior cultural correspondent, DH shared his take on the Joffrey's latest. 

The first piece, Forgotten Land, began with a cluster of dancers in baggy clothing, including floor-length dresses. Not a tutu in sight. Nor was there much walking around on their toes by the women. I’m sure there’s a dance name for that, but it doesn’t really matter.

The dark stage had a backdrop that looked something like a Great Plains supercell was waiting to happen. The sound effects of violent wind whipping around the dancers reminded me of the arctic cold outside. One by one, and sometimes in pairs or trios, they wriggled like leaves falling off tree branches, blown around the stage and coming back to rest in their original spot. When the orchestra began, the music (Benjamin Britten’s Sinfonia da Requiem Opus 20) was disturbing. It was not a pleasant, joyous sight to watch the dance, but it was hypnotizing nonetheless.

I don't see a lot of live dance performances, but I immediately GOT IT. I sat there thinking that I understood perfectly what the performers were trying to convey. The entire first piece seemed to be about desolation. Like early North Dakota settlers in an 1870 blizzard, stretching to be free of the confines of their primitive huts, where they were snowed in for the winter. Anyway, that’s what I was thinking, but I was still chilled from walking to the theater.

The choreographer, Jiri Kylian of the Czech Republic, said it was based on a painting by Edvard Munch of women staring at the sea. In some ways, though, the ballet evoked the desperation and anxiety of The Scream.

But on a more pleasant side, it’s amazing to watch human beings who spend their days stretching and dancing (as opposed to sitting at desks writing) their limbs all over the place. The women kicked the hems of their long dresses higher than human thighs ought to allow. And the men casually lifted and carried their partners all over the stage. Typical ballet stuff, but it’s still impressive to watch.

Tipping Point, British choreographer Ashley Page’s piece, was even more intriguing, although still unsettling. All the performers, men and women, wore similar sleeveless, legless outfits. In some cases, this greatly accentuated the difference in stature between, say, a male dancer well over 6 feet tall, and his much smaller female partner. In fact, throughout the entire piece, I felt we were forced to focus more on the dancer’s movement because their costumes made them harder to distinguish from one another.

Bold Moves will end its run at the Auditorium Theater of Roosevelt University on February 21.

Tuesday, February 02, 2016

College Application Update in Haiku

college scholarship haiku
A friend of mine started this Facebook group, Haiku Moms, and it's been a fun distraction as well as a creative outlet. As far as the college stuff goes, I'd say all of the applications are in, though I'm not sure if my son agrees. I think he does, though, especially after DH and I explained that any future applications will be on his dime. At this point he's been accepted to several great schools and he's excited about a couple of them in particular.

It's still near impossible to figure out how much any given school will cost. I have a note from a recent Financial Aid Night at school, that many people typically pay about somewhere around 50% of the sticker price at schools. It's like shopping at Kohl's. Did you get the 15% coupon or the 30% one? It seems like most everyone gets a little something off, whether it's because they took a certain class in high school, got a certain test score or come from a certain background. So what does the sticker price mean, anyway? Even the Net Price Calculators can only give you a general expected figure, though some schools do have price calculators that can estimate grants and merit aid.

Needless to say, we've encouraged my son to pursue some scholarships and a few weeks ago, I "live haiku'd" my side of the experience. In talking with friends who also have high school seniors, my experience seems to be a universal one. It's a bumpy road, this whole "getting your child ready to leave the nest" thing. Even when it's clear your child is itching to spread his wings.

*Sigh*


What's the hurry, Mom?
Scholarship applications
Not due til midnight!

"Hey, look at this, Mom."
"Your finished scholarship app?"
"Funny Twitter things."

Scholarship essay
Just about ready to send.
Due in half an hour.

Essay deadline met!
Will brilliant child's efforts
Reap handsome reward?

Oh, and in the meantime, my sophomore took the PSAT last fall and left an email address that leads to my inbox. Since scores were released a few weeks ago, my inbox has been deluged with email from schools that want to "get to know him." Seriously, I'm getting about a dozen messages a day offering a free quiz to choose a major, a free booklet sharing tips for a great college visit, etc.  Each one has a "hook," but I'm not biting and neither is he because I delete the messages.

I imagine that once the thrill of the attention wears off for students (like in maybe two days?), these messages just become a pain. For me, it's a bit confusing as several of the schools reaching out to him are schools my older son has applied to. I'm tempted to ask them to wait until we're finished with child number 1 before they starting wooing number two.